Posts tagged teach private english classes
useful auxiliar tip: how to conduct your first private english conversation lesson
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A blank slate can be rather intimidating.
Signing up a new student or group for private English conversation classes is thrilling! You start thinking of all sorts of ideas for teaching the class, you dream of all the money you'll be earning, and you imagine how awesome your new student or students are going to think you are.
But then you realize that before any of that can happen, you've got to make it through your very first lesson. What do you do with a brand new student? Where do you start if you don't know where to start?
I had the same fears when teaching my first lesson, but after finding this guide for conducting your first private English lesson with a new student, I no longer feel any trace of fear or worry.
Essentially, this guide provides you a framework for treating the initial lesson as more of a getting-to-know-you session, which is what it should be. You need to figure out what level of English your student has, what his or her interests and goals are, and you need to share a bit of your experience and teaching methods. By removing the pressure to perform in the blind on your very first meeting, you'll lay the foundation for a much more productive interaction between you and your student going forward.
I usually charge a reduced rate or even give this introductory 'lesson' for free to new students, and often the first lesson is much shorter - say 40 minutes versus an hour - than a regular lesson. How you modify the guide's suggested steps is up to you.
What other suggestions do you have for successfully conducting a private lesson with a new student?
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useful auxiliar tip: the 15-minute back pocket exercise
Keep a back-pocket full of 15-minute activities, exercises or simple games that you can whip out at a moment’s notice. It should be something that is suitable or easily adaptable for all levels, and doesn’t need any special materials or equipment. Invariably, you will find yourself in a situation where the teacher has deserted you or you have extra time on your hands at the end of a previous activity. I call them 'gaping hole' moments. You don’t want gaping hole moments. A few of my favorite 15-minute activities: Celebrity, Jeopardy!, conversation cards, and a little game I like to call 'Say It, Spell It, Count It'. With this game, I write different words, numbers, or simple math problems on slips of paper. Each student takes turn pulling a slip of paper from the bag. They have to either say the word in English (it's written in Spanish on the paper), Spell the word in English (also written in Spanish on the paper), or count something (i.e., say a number or give the answer to a simple problem).
What sort of 'gaping hole' activities do you use with your classes and private lessons?